Changing your address


A little trick, somewhat more advanced, but it’ll come in handy one day. Linux users are more used of changing the IP address of their computer system with the command line (however, lately, there is also a GUI available for this).

However windows users are more spoiled when it comes to this. There is a very easy way to enter the IP information in a little menu. Until the day, this no longer works, or that you simply haven’t got access to this GUI.

No worries, you can change the configuration of your network card by using the command prompt. Fairly easy even.

Alright, let’s give it a try. Open up your command box (start >> run >> cmd or for vista/7 users, just type cmd in the search box, your ‘puter will find it).

Type the command IPCONFIG and hit enter. The output will be the current configuration of all the available network interfaces, including your loopback interface if available.
This should look a little like this:

Wireless LAN-adapter for Wireless networkconnection 2:

   Media state. . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
   Connectspec. DNS-suffix:

Wireless LAN-adapter for Wireless networkconnection:

   Connectspec. DNS-suffix:
   Link-local IPv6-adres . . . . . . : fe80::9571:e42c:8347:916c%12
   IPv4-adres. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.7
   Subnetmask. . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Standardgateway. . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

Something in that nature. Note that I got 2 network interfaces. One connected and one disconnected. The connected one has the IP 192.168.1.7.
Let’s give the second wireless connection the address 192.168.1.8. We can use following command to do so:

netsh interface ip set address name=”Wireless networkconnection 2” static 192.168.1.8 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1

The name is the actual “name” of the interface. So the name you see in the output of the ipconfig. In my case Wireless networkconnection 2. If you have spaces in your name, like me. Put it between double quotes, else you’ll get an error.

If we run the IPCONFIG command again:

Wireless LAN-adapter for Wireless networkconnection 2:

   Connectspec. DNS-suffix:
   Link-local IPv6-adres . . . . . . : fe80::0987:e353:8365:234c%11
   IPv4-adres. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.8
   Subnetmask. . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Standardgateway. . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

Wireless LAN-adapter for Wireless networkconnection:

   Connectspec. DNS-suffix:
   Link-local IPv6-adres . . . . . . : fe80::9321:e421:8327:915c%13
   IPv4-adres. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.7
   Subnetmask. . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
   Standardgateway. . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1

Tadaa…

May come in handy, you never know.

Let me know if you have questions!

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